Category Archives: Pain

Dietary Protein Fact or Myth

Are you getting your daily requirements?

One of the main problems I encounter in clinic is client’s overall dietary deficiency in daily protein. There are many factors for this macro nutrient deficiency. Firstly there is a lot of misinformation regarding protein itself and secondly clients seem afraid of acidifying their bodies by eating too much protein and thirdly it can often be the cost involved, particularly with a large family to feed. To understand protein and its requirements here are the facts:

Before any health issues can be resolved, healing, regeneration, balancing or detoxification undertaken the body must have its required daily protein intake.

Protein is an essential part of the diet. It is made up of various combinations of small organic chemicals called Amino acids. When we eat food, containing protein it is broken down during digestion into its constituent amino acids. These amino acids are absorbed by our bodies and are used to produce new proteins and other necessary substances. Our bodies can make some of the amino acids (non-essential) (see table 1) needed to manufacture proteins, but others must be obtained from the diet; these are the eight so-called amino acid during early growth and development ‘essential’ amino acids (table 1). In addition, infants need one other for growth and development.

Proteins form part of the structure of the body, so that a continual supply of amino acids is needed. Our bodies are able to put these basic amino acid units together, using different arrangements of amino acids, to produce specific proteins, which can only be produced if all the necessary amino acids are available.

Essential Nonessential **
Histidine Infants Alanine
Isoleucine Arginine*
Leucine Aspartic acid
Lysine Cysteine*
Methionine Glutamic acid
Phenylalanine Glutamine*
Threonine Glycine*
Tryptophan Proline*
Valine Serine*
Tyrosine*
Asparagine*
Selenocysteine

(*) Essential only in certain cases.

(**) Pyrrolysine, sometimes considered “the 22nd amino acid”, is not listed here as it is not used by humans

Eukaryotes can synthesize some of the amino acids from other substrates. Consequently, only a subset of the amino acids used in protein synthesis are essential nutrients.

The nutritional value of a protein food can be judged by its ability to provide both the quantity and number of essential amino acids needed by the body. Different food sources contain different groups of proteins, which are made up of different arrangements and amounts of amino acids. In general, proteins from animal sources are of greater nutritional value because they usually contain all the essential amino acids. Proteins from plant sources, such as cereals and vegetables, may be deficient in one or other of the essential amino acids. For example, the proteins obtained from wheat lack adequate quantities of one essential amino acid, and those from beans are deficient in another.

Because the deficiency is different in each food, when they are eaten together they complement each other and the mixture is of higher nutritional value than the separate foods, and is as good as animal protein. It is important, particularly for strict vegetarians who do not consume dairy or egg products (see Table2a), that a variety of different types of protein foods are eaten.

Cooking can alter the amino-acid composition of protein and this usually results in desirable flavour and browning development. Very little nutritional value is lost.

RECOMMENDED DAILY DIETARY INTAKE OF PROTEIN IN AUSTRALIA

The recommended dietary intake (RDI) in Australia is one gram per kilogram of body weight per day. The protein intake for a 70-kilogram man is 70 grams and for a 58-kilogram woman, 58 grams per day. However growing children, pregnant and lactating women, people undergoing stress, or are unwell (severe infections or surgery) or undergo heavy exercise or work have a greater requirement for protein because of the additional needs of these conditions (see Table 2b).

A deficiency of protein in the diet can lead to muscle wasting, fatigue, weight loss, illness, oedema, anaemia and, in children, a failure to thrive, behaviour and attention problems. Higher levels of protein consumption appear to be neither beneficial nor harmful. However, it is possible that additional calcium may be required to counterbalance an excessive protein intake. Also there is a higher load of protein breakdown products, which must be excreted by the kidneys. This is where the theoretical concerns for acidity are derived from, however if you eat a variety of fruit, vegetables and leafy greens this becomes a very well-balanced diet.

 Table 2a

Grams of protein in animal foods vs. plant foods
Animal Proteins (100g) Grams of protein Plant Proteins (100g) Grams of protein
Beef 29-32 grams Legumes (Chickpeas, lentils, kidney beans) 6-7 grams
Chicken 25-28 grams Nuts (Almonds, brazil nuts, cashews) 15-20 grams
Fish 18-23 grams Seeds (Sunflower, sesame, pepitas) 20-22 grams
Eggs 5 grams per egg Tofu 8 grams
Cheese (Cheddar) 25 grams Leafy greens (Spinach, kale, rocket, lettuce, bok choi etc) 1.6 – 4.3 grams

(Kale is the highest at 4.3 grams)

Yoghurt (Natural) 5 grams Vegetables (Broccoli, beans, snow peas, cucumber, zucchini, peas) 0.8 – 5.1 grams (Green peas are the highest at 5.1g)
Milk (Whole) 3 grams Fruits (Apples, bananas, pears, kiwifruit etc) 0.3 – 1.7 grams
Protein powder (Whey) 80-90 grams Protein powder (pea) 82 grams

Table 2b

Daily Protein Requirements
Activity Level/Age group Grams of protein
Low activity (sedentary) adults Males 1g per kg                  Females 0.8-1g per kg
Light to moderate exercise – adults 1.2-1.4 g per kg
Active/Teenagers 1.4-1.6g per kg
Very active/Young children 1.6-1.8g per kg
Weight training/Infants 1.8-2.0g per kg
*Generally women require 15% less protein than males.  The required protein intake throughout pregnancy is 1.2g per kg of body weight.

(Australian Sports Commission, 2009)

* further information @ http://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/protein.htm

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Understanding Inflammation

 

We have all felt the effects of inflammation in our body whether it has been from an injury (new or old), illness, flu or a repetitive strain injury (RSI). General discomfort of pain, heat, swelling redness, loss of function of the affected tissue can make life difficult. ‘Inflammation’ we are told needs to be controlled, reduced and even blocked with various steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and injections, so we can simply get on with it and not let this pain affect our work or lifestyle.

In fact inflammation in our body is a natural and desirable action that is actually a means of ridding the body of damaged tissue, wastes and foreign objects or toxins. If the body can’t eliminate these wastes, it deposits these toxins into the injured site or somewhere else in the body, which creates further swelling, pain or degeneration of body tissue leading to chronic inflammation. This can happen when pure anti-inflammatory agents are prescribed slowing the body’s healing by blocking the removal of these wastes. Although temporarily pain free, if left solely on these medications the client may be left with weakened joints, scarring, thickened tissue or hardened calcification (frozen) joints. This can mean never able to recover naturally, or often requiring surgery.

Bio-regulatory medicine (also known as homotoxicology) and its sister modality Bio-puncture offer a different approach to inflammation. This approach utilizes unique effective, safe ‘evidence-based’ medicines. Their individual components are designed to have a functional affect for all the phases of inflammation with an affinity for the different body tissue being affected, such as bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood and lymph vessels, nerves and soft tissues. When this system is used for healing, the inflammatory and pain process is activated and regulated with antioxidant, anti-microbial support, as well as protection and control of proliferation of tissue. This supports tissue remodeling, which means the body is able to quickly and effectively heal injury or illness without scar tissue, calcification or further suppression of symptoms.

This system of medicine can be used for all types of injury, swelling, pain, spasms, arthritis, joint/spinal degeneration, bursitis, RSI, carpel tunnel, frozen shoulder, golfer or tennis elbow. It can be used concurrently with medications and can assist pre and post surgery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peeling off the Layers – Bio-Regulatory Medicine

Bio-regulatory Medicine (BRM) is overall, an evolution of scientific exploration and the art of prescribing to aid the body’s natural healing abilities. It takes into consideration techniques that can induce a self-regulatory reaction in our innate healing mechanisms and attempts to influence the body directly and indirectly, using saline and medicinal stimulants, so that the body’s own regulatory process can restore the disruptive functions back to normal. It has very minimal side effects, but is powerful and gentle at the same time encouraging healing by peeling off the layers, mentally, emotionally and physically. This ‘unwrapping’, can be directed by the practitioner and client and can be short, medium or long term and is what i specifically love about this treatment.

Bioregulatory Medicine is considered to be a bridge between the natural healing mechanisms of the body and the medicines and techniques that all health care professionals seek to optimise. It focus on the systemic effects of imbalance within the person. Whether it is an imbalance of mental, physical, emotional or spiritual matter.

Within this model, dis-functions or diseases of the body/mind are considered to be ultimately caused by toxins, whether toxic chemicals, bacterial exotoxins, biological endotoxins, post-traumatic cellular debris and also byproducts of the bodies metabolic processes. Furthermore, disease symptoms are said to be the result of the body’s attempt to heal itself and should not necessarily be suppressed.

Homeopathically manufactured single or combination products are designed to work with the body’s defence mechanisms and facilitate the body’s elimination of toxic substances. When used in combination formulations which contain measurable amounts of homoeopathically-prepared active ingredients, they can be utilised by the practitioner to treat specific indications.

The focus of treatment is on tissue type and integrity, as well as congestion and inflammation around that site or in the body generally. For example, nerve damage or sciatic pain has wonderful results using Colocynthis Homaccord, furthermore it provides health care solutions which may be used alone or with Bio-puncture, body therapies, counselling and homoeopathy. Other natural medicine strategies, such as nutritional, herbal medicines and flower remedies can also help manage the client’s health furthermore it can complement orthodox treatment without drug interactions.

Bio-regulatory medicine (aka Homotoxicology) studies the influences of toxic substances in humans, where symptoms and disease are seen as a result of the appropriate biological resistance to these toxic substances (homotoxins). Therefore disease is recognised as a healing process within humans (and animals) and anti-homotoxic preparations are therefore designed to deal with the distinct stages of an illness.

Evidence based theory Bio-regulatory medicine is a sophisticated modern form of homoeopathy and is the most prescribed form of natural medicine in Germany, where it has been used for over 50 years and is practiced by conventional doctors and natural therapists alike. In fact, 80% of orthodox doctors in Germany prescribe homoeopathic or anti-homotoxic preparations for their patients. The efficacy and safety of this medicine is supported by close to 100 clinical trials and provides health professionals with medicines that complement orthodox treatments and provide the patient with better health outcomes than they can achieve through orthodox medicines alone. The guiding diagnostic and prescriptive tool used in BRM is known as the Six-Phase Table.